Trove of Unseen Documents Reveal How Jack Ruby Got the Death Penalty

By Stephen Young, Dallas Observer

When now Dallas County District Judge Brandon Birmingham started working in the Dallas County District Attorney’s Office’s cold case unit, one set of files that was forbidden fruit, even for the highest ranking members of the office.

“There, in the warehouse of the DA’s office in a corner, was the file that we were never allowed to touch, the file of Jack Ruby,” Birmingham said Wednesday night at Dallas’ Sixth Floor Museum. “I was always very curious about why that was, what was in there. There was just this mystique about it.” Read More

Dallas County District Attorney’s AIM program allows second chance for inmates

By FOX4News.com Staff

The Dallas County District Attorney’s AIM program provides a second chance for young inmates.

The AIM program, which stands for “Achieve Inspire Motivate”, gives young offenders the chance to complete certain classes. It targets young people who are in prison for non-violent offenses. After graduating from AIM, the participant’s case will be dismissed and immediately expunged. Read More

Judge Brandon Birmingham and Toby Shook to present special program at the Sixth Floor Museum, The Assassin’s Assassin: A Case Study of the Jack Ruby Trial

Judge Brandon Birmingham and Toby Shook to present special program at the Sixth Floor Museum, The Assassin’s Assassin: A Case Study of the Jack Ruby Trial

DALLAS, TX – July 10, 2017: America watched as Lee Harvey Oswald, the alleged assassin of President John F. Kennedy, was shot point-blank by Jack Ruby on November 24, 1963, at the Dallas Police headquarters as he was being transferred to the Dallas County Jail. This was the first murder broadcast live on American television. In the emotional aftermath of the Kennedy assassination, Ruby’s case was rushed to trial. Held just months later, Ruby’s trial was hailed by news media as “the trial of the century.”

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Justice Served Via Second Chances

By DALLAS (CBS11) 

Monday in Dallas County, justice was served in the form of second chances.

A diversion court program called AIM, which stands for Achieve Inspire Motivate, graduated its first five participants.

James Reddic was among them.

“I’m just glad to be free,” said Reddic, now 20. He was 17 when he made what he freely calls a stupid mistake. For three years the felony indictment has been both a burden and a roadblock. “I was struggling to get a job, couldn’t even get a basic job,” explained Reddic. Read More